‘Slow-mover’ Installation

This installation is typically paired with a more frenetic visual piece as so to provide some direct antithesis and a strong sense of dichotomy.

The piece serves as a moving canvas, gradually transforming throughout the 7 hour period of exhibition into complete abstraction and eventual removal from its original spiralling form. The piece illustrates how our perception can change through time, without our noticing and how what was once immediately recognisable can become eschewed beyond our recognition.

“I enjoy people watching immensely and find this installation to be analogous to that so peaceful act of observation. How we can watch things slowly move around & still remain the same but somehow looking away and returning your gaze can make the changes, however minute, all the more obvious.”

I feel that this experience is a very relatable one that can be applied to many aspects of the human condition, specifically to our relationships with each other and more importantly, our selves.

‘Slow-mover’ installation documentation from Aaron mears on Vimeo.




Installed at Hope Works in Sheffield for Pretty Pretty Good, various instances, 2018-2019

Zebra – Bennet Foddy

http://www.foddy.net/zebra/

A minimalist maze game seemingly designed to hurt your eyes by rendering all textures as the ‘zebra’ pattern of repeating monochromatic lines.
I enjoy playing this game for the sheer difficulty it takes merely to look at it & discern which direction you are supposed to be going. Which is nearly impossible.

I am often concerned that a lot of the aesthetic within my work relies too heavily on an ‘Optical Illusion’ aspect, this game illustrates these concerns perfectly, it almost physically hurts my eyes to play this game for more than a few minutes. Which is something I try to steer away from, for obvious reasons. However after seeing how other artists have replicated this for a plethora of applications I’m beginning to reconsider my approach to this ‘difficulty of perception’. Not wanting to lose the “microcosm of subtlety” my work displays, it will be a welcome challenge integrating this style into my own.

(below – Portrait of artist Akiyoshi Kitaoka)